Why food shouldn’t be your prime concern to lose weight

Being in the fitness industry now for over a decade I can confidently say that the large majority of people that I talk to would like to be at least a little leaner.

 

This is the result of so many different things including (but not limited to): how we are educated around health and wellness, the medical  system (not health) we have, the conflicting interests of ‘health’ and supplement companies, the time pressures we face in the 21st century and mainstream media to name a few.  

 

This epidemic of our populations being overweight may be contributed to by the above but then on an individual level it seems to always come back to the notion that what we are eating is the problem and is making us overweight and unhappy.   

 

Although I am not here to say that what we eat does not in fact have a physical and psychological effect on our bodies – I am here more to say that there’s a deeper rooted problem than just eating too much.  

 

Our problem isn’t food..

 

What we need to understand is that our beliefs affect our thoughts, which affect our emotions, which affect our actions.   

 

You can think of eating as the end of the chain – our actions.  This means our eating is affected by our emotions, which are affected by our thoughts, which are affected by our beliefs.

 

So if we go back one level to our emotions it becomes clear that what we eat (the actions we take) is affected by how we feel.  I’m sure you can connect to this notion.  Perhaps when you are feeling down you reach for something that makes you feel happy (quick serotonin hit).    On this level we should be looking at all the parts of who we are.  

 

We all spend a large amount of time working so it makes sense that if we are not happy with our work our emotions will lead us to eating not aligned with how we would like.   

 

This is the same with our relationships – intimate and not.  If these aren’t in order and making your life better than it is likely you won’t be eating well.  

It’s not just about food..

This also brings me to the point that although everything that affects our emotions are going to affect our actions, I believe that this lack – be it connection, fulfilment, alignment or any other disconnect with your life is actually going to play just as big a role in your overall health as the food itself anyway.   

 

If we want to go right back to the root problem (always a good idea) instead of just dealing with the superficial band aid of ‘eating better’ we come up against our beliefs.  Who am I? What am I worthy of? What is my place in the world?  

 

These existential questions that place us in the world are largely answered by our child selves.   The problem is they are often not updated to help us as adults.  

 

 A good place to start is to bring awareness to how you are feeling when you reach for the food.   Is it a void that you are trying to fill? Is it boredom? Sadness? Even happiness we celebrate with food and drink in our culture.   

 

Once you start getting some awareness then look for some patterns and look at the areas of your life that you could be more satisfied with and start taking some small steps to head towards a more positive place in these areas.  

 

We all know that the salad is probably better for us than the burger and chips so let’s work towards understanding ourselves on a deeper level.   

 

If this article resonates with you please share it to anyone that you think it may help.   We want to help more people feel their best in a sustainable manner.

 

Written by Luke Sharp, Owner of The Wild Movement.

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The Unsexy truth about losing weight long term

Although we don’t market ourselves as a gym that’s about aesthetics – the large proportion of clientele that come to us (and any gym) still would like to lose body fat and possibly gain some muscle.  A big problem in today’s society, that is being played out by the fitness industry so well is that people have been told that they need to exercise more and eat less to lose weight.   It is true and there is indisputable evidence to show that energy in versus energy out needs to be swinging the right way to lose weight (or gain weight).    However this truth has also led us astray in how we go about it which is affecting our ability to be lean the way we would like long term.

The problem stems from the fact that we already live in a society that most of us feel is pushing us to do more and be more.   More time at work.  More deadlines.  More pushing through the day with back to back meetings and having no time to eat, let alone take a deep breath or get outside.   More pressure to meet the big mortgage repayments to live in the big house that we need.  To drive the nice car that we need.    So what happens when we believe that we need to start pushing ourselves more by ‘smashing ourselves’ at the gym?

What happens is that we join a gym and have this association that the more we sweat, the higher our heart rate, the more we are sore, the better our weight loss will be.   This may get us some short term wins (great!) but in the long term all we are really doing at this point is:

  • Adding more stress and more feeling of pressure to our already long list of pressures
  • We are putting band aids on the root problem
  • We are trying to make up for lost time (not possible)

The main problem with the above approach is simply we don’t have the foundation to support this type of training where the goal is to ‘flog’ yourself.   The foundation of consistent quality sleep (7-9 hours), of stress management and of sound nutrition.  When we don’t have the above foundation solid and we add in regular intense training to lose weight the result is normally one that doesn’t stay for long.

So what is the solution?  Moving and training is obviously a good thing.   Living in extremes is not (long term).  The approach we encourage our new clients to take:

  • Start with 2-3 Strength sessions per week.  We do a thorough initial consultation and then ensure they start conservative on their strength numbers so we can progress over time.
  • Know that most of our adaptations happen from the strength training and not from how much you were out of breath the whole session.
  • Focus on 1-2 habits with nutrition or sleep or stress management to start building the foundation whilst introducing training without the training overtaking your life.
  • Once the above habits are who you are then the next steps can be looked at.
  • Setting some clear expectations of where they would like to be in 2 months and one year from now.
  • Knowing that small consistent steps daily are much more powerful than big jumps away from who you are weekly or monthly.

By turning around the focus from having to do more and ‘smash one self’ to actually only encouraging a couple of sessions per week to start and then putting in extra effort into building the foundation allows the client to change their environment and make sustainable changes.

We have used this method from when we opened our doors almost three years ago and is why many of our clients who “weren’t gym people” are still with us three years later and have completely changed their beliefs and feelings around who they are and what they are capable of doing.

If you would like to know more or start changing your life and health you can book in for an initial consultation and 2 trial sessions on us.   You can do this by clicking HERE. 

 

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